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Ann interviews Julie Bradshaw

Ann: So Julie Bradshaw. We finally got are time to talk. You're a hard lady to pin down, but then again most creative people are very busy aren't they?Julie Bradshaw: Yes.Ann: I am Ann Walker Peri and this is for business radio. And I am, well I guess Julie tell me where we are.Julie Bradshaw: We're in my studio.Ann: It's a fantastic studio. I mean everywhere you look there's just something. Whether it be like old books or spray cans. I mean look at that clock. Julie Bradshaw just to let everyone know, you're an international artist, you're Oxford Brook's trained, I guess people have been, people would have been lucky enough to see your work; installation art at the Tower of London.Julie Bradshaw: Yes I did.Ann: Varies galleries around the world. Also one that you were telling me about, the public art, the timeline on Minster Abby, the Gatehouse Project?Julie Bradshaw: Yes, yes, yes.Ann: But gosh, you've done some really amazing things in your lifetime. I mean paintings and sculptures and private collections all over the world. I think I read somewhere, two things that just recently in the last couple of years. One's the Bristle Art Festival?Julie Bradshaw: Yes. Knockfest international event. I was selected for that. Ann: You were selected to?Julie Bradshaw: Myself and my daughterJulie Bradshaw: It was awesome. Absolutely awesome. Got to meet artists from all around the world that are renowned for their graffiti. Didn't Meet Banksy but then I might have without knowing it because no one knows who he is.Ann: Well if no one knows who he is yeah. That's quite true. The list goes on I mean you've been nominated for outstanding artist at the 2014 Sea Art Fair. Wow, what, I know you're trained and everything looking around your studio you have such amazing talent.Julie Bradshaw: Aw thank you.Ann: I mean where did all this come from?Julie Bradshaw: I don't know, It's just me. My art is and always has been an integral part of me. Apparently I didn't speak for a long time and they were very worried about me but if you gave me crayons and pencils, things to make things with I just I wasn'it really interested in conversing with anyone else apparently. I just wanted to create art and it's my life's blood. That's how I have to explain it because it's so much more. I have to create most days. Even when I'm out on a walk or go on holiday I don't take a camera I also take paper, pencils and just shove it in my back pocket and I'll just draw things that interest me and from that usually I think: Oh this could happen or maybe I could take it down this path and yeah. Obviously I paint but I do a lot more. I'm very interested ...Ann: You do, I'm just looking over my shoulder at some of the endangered wild life sculptures as well.Julie Bradshaw: That's a project that's very close to my heart cause I love wild life. I'm very interested and I'm very lucky to live by the sea and live near some amazing wildlife that I observe. But I'm interested worldwide in animals as well. Conducting a project at the moment which is sorta ongoing because it's very time consuming but I'm painting my car.Ann: Oh yeah.Julie Bradshaw: With all endangered species from around the world.Ann: I've seen that. That's amazing.Julie Bradshaw: I get a lot of interest from that which gives me opportunity to talk to people and tell them, which animals are endangered and why. Especially children, they want to know why are they endangered and what's happening and that gives me the chance to talk about that. My art enables me to have a voice and find a way of getting a message across to people really. We're gonna lose these wonderful animals and little things you know, even the ugly things like Natorjack Toad, which is a British. We are close to losing that so he went on the car as well even though he's quite ugly. He's not fluffy and cuddly. He's quite bi liked. Ann: But you know he's living breathing kinda organic, living breathing thing.Julie Bradshaw: He has his place in the cycle. You know each species helps another one. Either his food or they'll do something that enable another one to eat. It's just an ongoing thing and you know once you start losing some very animals or insects like are Bumble Bee, that's another one. A lot of the Bumble Bees are in deep trouble in England and we need to and the scientist are really working hard trying to make sure cuz if we lose the Bumble Bees we don't get the pollination. And it has a knock on effect.Ann: It does. It sounds as though ...Julie Bradshaw: It's part of my life's blood again. That's an element of me that's always there. I'm always looking for ways of creating art and it can be installation art as well, which I find quite, it gets a message across. Murals, I do large scale murals.Ann: So it's not just painting for paintings sake.Julie Bradshaw: No.Ann: To beautify someones office although that has it's place.Julie Bradshaw: I still do that. I'm an artist I got to make a living haven't I.Ann: Yes, yesJulie Bradshaw: I mean it's that juggling thing. Very often when I work with children I'd go into to schools, hospitals I've worked in, The John Radcliffe Hospital. I run an art project, which is working with children that are extremely ill. Terminally ill. That was one of, very big part, it sorta, had a lasting impact on my life really. Working with the parents working with the children. But I make it comical as well cuz very often children go well we want to be an artist you know and I say that's cool you know if you want a really interesting life where you'll get to do lots of interesting things and meet lots of interesting people and maybe play a part in looking after say like the wildlife and things like that then an artist.Ann: Sure, yeah.Julie Bradshaw: If your priority is a bit for a Porsche car, or maybe a big swimming pool or a big house or something then unless you get to the very, very top you'll make money. It's a choice and I made that choice that my art was always going to be an integral part and that's the part that ...Ann: But you've really been privileged to be with one of the last people that these sick children, you know as you said, would see and bringing to the forefront, some difficult, you know sometimes some very difficult topics, as endangered art.Julie Bradshaw: Yes, yes, yes ... Ann: Children that are sick.Julie Bradshaw: Children actually cope with it relatively well I've found while I was working, It's the parents and the grandparents, it's so heart rending you know to be ...Ann: Of course. Julie Bradshaw: The actual project was funded by Kids of Art. There was a new, a charity, they were the ones that placed me, bought me the place to work there. Initially, the funding was just for me to work with the children, but it became very clear, quite quickly that the parents ... obviously, with their child, and the grandparents and aunties. It needed to be extended. I went back to them and said, "Can we have some more money?"They were very kind and gave us more money. We worked, we did some wonderful things. The children were able to create various pieces of art where they put messages in, which they wanted their parents to have after they'd gone. It was ...Ann: Sweet.Julie Bradshaw: I came away humbled, is the word I'd perhaps use. It was a ... the nursing staff, and the doctors and nurses were absolutely wonderful. The art therapists, because they have art therapists ...Ann: Of course they do.Julie Bradshaw: I thought that it might be a little bit ... come in along here, but they were wonderful as well. We all worked together. It was all for the same purpose, to give these children something else. Some days, I'd work with children down in the day room, because they were well enough to come down. Other times it would have to be by the bed side.Ann: Of course.Julie Bradshaw: You had to always have that in your head, with the planning. You plan, but you have to be able to adapt and change.Ann: Sure.Julie Bradshaw: That was another experience that I really had a wonderful time. I worked with the young homeless a lot. Ann: Okay.Julie Bradshaw: Worked ...Ann: Again, another kind of social topic that's not always easy to communicate or be received.Julie Bradshaw: Art is a really good way of communication. That was a centre called the Gap, and the staff were wonderful. I used to go in and run art projects. We had a big exhibition, which ... it was just wonderful. The mayor came, and the young people really were proud. Really were proud of what they'd done. That was, in turn, made me ... I get very emotional. Watching young people that have had quite a hard, not a very nice life up until then and actually seeing some of the staff really work hard with, you know.Again, it's another aspect that I'm quite interested in. Always bringing art and involving other people. Nobody should ever be shut out. I'm not an artist who just works and then produces. I very much work in the community as well, I like people to ...Ann: It sounds like you created a big impact on, I would say, every person that you touch. You put so much into your paintings, your sculpting, and then of course, the installation art, the public art. I know we mentioned the gatehouse project. Tell us a little bit about that.Julie Bradshaw: That was, again, a funded project. I had to go for interview, I was very lucky and got chosen. It was to create a timeline that in this 12th century spiral staircase that went right up to the roof. You can go onto the roof as well to view it.Ann: I've seen pictures of that, you showed me, yeah.Julie Bradshaw: I was so excited and privileged to be working in such an amazing place. The staff, again, wonderful. It's managed by volunteers, really, because it's a tiny little museum. It was wonderful. Then obviously this spiral staircase, it starts in mediaeval times, and then works its way up telling the history of Minster, Minster Abbey and the island, really, that we live on. That was amazing. I had a wonderful time. Included, I decided, because I like to include other people, we'd run some competitions, for the schools. Ann: Okay.Julie Bradshaw: Got the children to create some artwork where certain pieces were chosen. Then I, myself and my daughter painted their pictures into our artwork, so it become integral to it. They'd got their name on the wall and we had an official opening. The children were, you could see they were so proud. Even now, they bring visitors to that stairwell to show them their artwork.Ann: That's very special to them. Julie Bradshaw: Yeah.Ann: You know, from as long as we go back to cave paintings, art has always been there to story tell. Then middle ages, and the renaissance, and amazing, amazing art just to tell a story, wasn't it?Julie Bradshaw: It's sort of, I felt, we had to do a lot of research. It's quite funny, because when you're doing public art, you' always have to be aware that there is always going to be somebody come along say, "You don't a bird that's, or you don't get that date," and we'd got a date wrong. I worked hand in hand with several of the staff, and they did a lot of research as well with me. We got a date wrong. It wasn't a biggie, because I was able to repaint that bit the other day.Ann: I suppose that's the good thing about painting, you can always change something, right?Julie Bradshaw: I didn't pay thousands for printing and then go, "oh my goodness! No, that's wrong!"It was all very much done, it was only slightly out note, a gentleman came and saw it, and said, "I think you've got the dates wrong on that."We said, "We'll have a look.," and got back in contact with him and said, "You were right! We're going to change it"Ann: Being an artist, I mean, it's not always about fulfilled, is it.Julie Bradshaw: No.Ann: You've shared yourself a lot, but you as a person, because your art is so well received, and obviously seen, what can people kind of deduce from when they look at your art? You have brilliant styles, but there's just such a varied style.Julie Bradshaw: Yes.Ann: I know when we think about musicians, oh yes, that's a Tom Petty song, or that's a Tracy M and we know that, you know. That's a Rembrandt. What can we say about your art?Julie Bradshaw: I think, the way I've talked to people, because people do say that to me when they come to an exhibition, they all say my goodness, it's so diverse. You don't concentrate on one thing. Driven, I think is the word I would use to describe myself, because I'm so interested in many things. I'm interested in people, I love nothing more than sitting in the café with a cup of coffee, drawing different people, and overhearing conversations. I'll draw it, but then they might say something, either is quite touching, it might make me laugh, and I think, I've got to find a way of bringing that in to other than just painting.Ann: How do you do that?Julie Bradshaw: Create that, goes into installation pieces. Sometimes I'll use text in my paintings, because I love what somebody's said. I think that's got to go in there. I'll very often do that. That's where I suppose, all these different things evolve from. I did a fine art degree, but would you believe I never picked a paint brush up. I'm actually a self taught painter. We did things like video, film work, photography, black and white photography, which I absolutely loved doing. I love being in the dark room, and watching things, either develop good or not so good.It was very much, that was my degree, sort of looking at art history, more contemporary art, really. I was really lucky. I got accepted several other places that would have been more painterly degrees, but I had small children, I was a single parent at the time. I had to go where I thought I could manage my family better. Be there for the children, and again, the university was very good, they were very understanding. Yes, I did that, as a mature student, you see. That's another sort of story.Ann: I bet it is. You have a million stories! I hope that at some point we can maybe put them into little silos and figure out, you know, your kaleidoscope of a woman. You mentioned your daughter, a couple of times, that she helped you. It's quite nice that someone has a talent. IT's kind of passed down whether through the genes or you teaching them as small children. Tell us about your daughter.Julie Bradshaw: Anna, I've got three daughters, but Anna's the one, is the youngest, and she's the one that's sort of really followed in my footsteps. The other two are very art and creative, and they use it within their jobs. Anna's sort of really sort of come down the path. She works with me on quite a lot of the murals because I can trust her. I'm very, it's public art, it's got to be right.Ann: It has to be right, of course it does.Julie Bradshaw: I know that I can say to Anna, can you create, this is what I'd like here, and she sees the same vision as I do, she paints very similar to me. We work well together. We have our arguments, mother and daughter, of course, I thought it would be better with pale pinks and greens or something, and I go, no, no, no, it's got to be ... We always resolve and chat, we get on really well. She's like a best friend, really, my daughter.Ann: I had the pleasure of meeting her once. She does seem very, very pleasant. Her work is great. I look forward to seeing more of her work.Julie Bradshaw: Yes, if I can talk her into that. She loves helping me, but it's getting her to see that, actually, you're talented in your own right and you need to develop that, and get your own voice.Ann: That's a very poignant theme amongst artists, isn't it? We can go back in history, and see that there's insanity or some kind of mental illnesses, even artists from very well to do families, seemingly very healthy, seem to have it all kind of in their pocket. Then we see the artists that have virtually nothing but are still very happy. That is kind of a theme that runs through, having that self confidence.Julie Bradshaw: Definitely. Self confidence is part of it. I've got some wonderful art friends who are very talented, but they would never dream of painting in public, in front of people, because they're very shy, and feel that their work is absolutely pitch perfect, or turn of phrase, before anyone sees it, where I'm quite happy for people to see, as I'm going. I might make a mistake, and I think, I'll correct that, or that doesn't quite work. I'm quite confident in my ... it's taken years and years.Ann: I was going to say, were you always that confident?Julie Bradshaw: No, no. Ann: You did mention that you didn't talk for quite a while as a child ...Julie Bradshaw: When I was a child.Ann: Those crayons did the talking for you.Julie Bradshaw: Yeah. I still, my worst nightmare is usually the private views. I don't, still, to this day, don't really like being around my work when people come and see it for the first time. As an artist you always think, "Oh god, what if they don't like it? Or That's rubbish ... "Because art is part of us, it's much more ... you're putting yourself out there, your artwork is very much, you know, it can be quite daunting. I think I am quite, I usually find a corner and hide with a glass of wine.Ann: Oh dear!Julie Bradshaw: When I was at the city art fair, I mean, people, I'd gone off for coffee, and had people running back, said, "Julie, you've been nominated for outstanding artist!" And I went, oh, really? And I walked off! I went outside, they were like, "Come back, come back! You've got to ... "I was like, "No, I don't want to!"Ann: It's your ... this is, like you said, this is your life blood. I suppose, you know, through many different industries and positions in the world, there is that, trying to get that self confidence to do anything, isn't it? You mentioned about private views, when people come to see your work at galleries, or at charity balls, public displays ... What do you think about how people view artists' work? For me, as an art consultant, I kind of don't like the gallery formula for artists. I've told you this, I think.Julie Bradshaw: I get it, I get that.Ann: I just think, it's a place where it might turn people, the regular people off. When I go to a gallery opening, or if I just go to a gallery. A lot of the times, I see other artists, either there to support the artists that's on display, or, there are people who are kind of intellectual. The intellectual types, and they're there for the wine and the cheese!Julie Bradshaw: Yes! Oh, let's go and have a wine and cheese evening!Ann: Then there's other people that maybe kind of, their partner might have been dragging them kicking and screaming, come on, let's go to an art gallery, or ...Julie Bradshaw: Do I have to?Ann: Just kind of pulling them along. I've spoken to a lot of people kind of in the mainstream of corporates, and they say actually, I don't want to be put to the test, almost, of feeling as though I have to interpret someone's art. What do you think about that, because most people don't want to look bad, do they?Julie Bradshaw: No, I don't think anybody does, do they?Ann: Just that kind of proverbial, you know, the knuckle on the chin, you move your head to one side ...Julie Bradshaw: It's difficult, in a way, again, it's a confident thing. Confidence with certain people. I had a friend who was absolutely devastated. She was showing stuff, several people came up and said, well anyone could do that. You've just thrown paint. She, rather than stand up corner, and say, well actually, you couldn't do it how I've done it, it's individual. Afterwards, when I spoke with her, I said, I've been there, because your work is beautiful, and it stands in its own, but she didn't have the confidence, and it's absolutely ... I mean, she was going to give up painting until a few of us said, uh-uh, now you don't, come on, get your bum here. You're not giving up. Don't let people, because you're always going to get people ... It doesn't matter what you do in life, whether you're a computer person, you design ... Walt Disney was knocked down quite a lot, wasn't he, when he first started out with those, now look at the wonderful ... I'm a real fan of cartoons and animation and things. I really respect the animators that do all they do. There's always someone that's going to pick holes in that. It is hard, I would imagine, and you've maybe realised that sometimes it's hard for people like yourself. You've got to be honest with the artist, because you want us to move on and learn and maybe things aren't quite right. You could see that but you've got to find a way of telling it to us.Ann: I think there are times, as a kind of a coach to the artist that I represent, there are times when I have to be brutally honest.Julie Bradshaw: Say, that's not working!Ann: As you said, some of it can be so extremely personal, but in more of a commercial sense, you want people to like it, because as you said, you're in a business. Julie Bradshaw: You want to sell.Ann: That's right, you want to sell, people do what to beautify their homes. Hotels obviously want to create a space of luxury for their guests. Clients, people want to impress their clients so they'll do business with them. I always find it really funny how I do, when I go into perspective clients' offices, sometimes I just see these four walls of white walls, which doesn't really describe them. Art really can kind of pull the mission of a place. Just as like an artist puts a stamp on their own art, they can do that for other people.Julie Bradshaw: It can be even a starting point for people talking. They might start off discussing a painting, you know, the colours and things, they'll end up talking about world politics or something, but at least, they've started with the painting. It is a bit tongue in cheek, but you know. It can be like that. You have obviously the more serious side of things, like the endangered species ...Ann: Political art.Julie Bradshaw: Because I obviously create murals, I sort from various workshops, and I talk to the children about the fact that murals are so much more than just a pretty picture. If you look at the muralists from around the world, some of them are highly political, and they're making statements. This is happening, or this was happening, or that, they're very important pieces of artwork. It's just a different way of looking at art, isn't it?Ann: Yeah.Julie Bradshaw: I've done quite a lot of, I've done cafes and things like that, but I usually try to gear them to the way I want them to think, including wildlife, because I do love painting wild life. We painted a café, and it was .. Oh charming, a cat comes in! Come on, there you go.Ann: All sorts of wildlife walking into your studio.Julie Bradshaw: Yes, they do come and visit. I sort of include wildlife from the area so children learn about ... I love children. They're our future guardians.Ann: Oh, sure.Julie Bradshaw: If you capture a child's imagination and interest at a young age, hopefully they might grow up, think, oh yes, we'll go down that path. Not an artist, but maybe a conservationist or just being aware, that if you throw your rubbish down ... A, it doesn't look very nice, and, it can endanger animals. When you say that to children, and you explain how, they think, Oh! If it made a difference where a child thinks, "Throw rubbish down or put it in my pocket and find a bin, take it home put it in a bin." I've done my job.Ann: Well, you have done your job! I'm really impressed. I've always loved your art.Julie Bradshaw: Thank you.Ann: I really look forward to seeing the rest of the endangered species statues.Julie Bradshaw: I'm working on those at the moment.Ann: I love the fact that you've used, what is that, sheet music?Julie Bradshaw: Music sheets from sort of Victorian times, to be honest. There's a play on that, you know, using something with age. I love, you can see that.Ann: Can I interview you again, because I know you've got so many stories. As you said, you're a driven artist, and I really like that, driven. I've not really heard that in kind of the creative professional's terms, because normally that's kind of like a corporate theme, isn't it? It's like, driven managing director! Thank you, Julie.Julie Bradshaw: This person I'm not, though.Ann: Thank you Julie, I really appreciate your time. Again, I just, I could spend hours in the studio just looking at different sketchbooks, there's just so much history in here. Anyway, I hope you enjoyed yourself.Julie Bradshaw: Yeah, thank you.Ann: I hope our listeners enjoyed this, this story as well. I'm sure they will, but I look forward to interviewing you again. That's it for us for now. I'm signing out, this is Fenster Art Consultancy, and if you'd like to see Julie Bradshaw's work, you can login to wwww.fensterart.co.uk and look for Julie Bradshaw. Again, if you have any questions for Julie, certainly send us an e-mail! Julie Bradshaw: Definitely,Ann: That would be great. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and anyone interested in perhaps a commission or a public display of art ...Julie Bradshaw: Absolutely, I'm always interested in those.Ann: Excellent. Well, thank you Julie.

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Gift Cards from The Bodyshop

             

 

Well I wanted to stay away but you know me if there is something to bring to your attention you can depend on me to let you know.

Today I'd like to tell you about my experience at using a gift card that we'd received from The Bodyshop @TheBodyShop who are now owned by @LOreal_UKI @Loreal.

Someone gave us a Bodyshop gift card for Christmas but trying to use it has become a challenge, let me explain.

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Hey there!

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by default 6

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Make more money

Getting your clients to part with more money can be difficult especially if they are not getting in return. But if you can engage with them you probably have a netter chance of getting them to spend more with you instead of you having to constantly find new customers.

An innovative way to engage with your clients/customers is to have a podcast something that they can listen to, something that they will feel that they are getting value from or are interested in.

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Social media and dodgy email accounts.

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Internet Radio Advertising 101

Online Radio 101:

WHAT THEY ARE: Online radio ads, often referred to as “streaming audio ads,” ARE the ads you hear when listening to a radio station’s digital stream. This is typically at a computer or on a mobile device.WHAT THEY AREN’T: Online radio ads ARE NOT the ads you hear “over-the-air”. Over-the-air broadcasts are when you listen from a traditional radio player or in your car.COST EFFECTIVE: Online streams can play different advertisements than the ones heard over-the-air. This presents a unique, low cost opportunity for SMBs to deliver their message, promotion or special offer to a potential new customer for 30 seconds without any clutter or distraction.Reach: With online radio ads, SMBs can choose exactly how many customers will hear their ad and the times of day their ad will run.REACHES CUSTOMERS READY TO ACT: A key benefit of online radio ads is that listeners are on their computer or mobile device and are literally a tap or click away from your business. Your potential customers are poised to act immediately when they hear your special offer or promotion; whether that is calling to book an appointment or reservation or looking up store hours and directions.

Advertising with Business Radio costs around £7 per commercial and in some cases covers the cost of making the commercial too! contact us for more details..

 

Source : http://blog.1and1.com/2014/04/16/how-to-boost-your-business-with-online-radio-advertising/#

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Small business marketing

Small business marketing

People who are great at marketing…themselves!

As a small business you are always looking for ways to grow your business. You’ve probably tried to a few marketing ideas but the results have been at best low.

As an Entrepreneur you recognise that you need help so you are taken away from running the business to start looking for someone who can help you. It is important that you take the time to find the right person or organisation as there are so many “would be experts” out there.

But how do you find someone, after all, what is an expert? I’ve known many experts, some claim to be good while others have shown me that I can afford today their monthly fees but none of them have made a difference to my business.

When people are experts, what does that mean? Expert according to whom?

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Here are some quick ways to get more sales!

Here are some quick ways to get more sales!

1. Networking: Meeting other business people and telling them what your business is about is a great way to grow your network and grow your social circle. But don’t just think that all you have to do is turn up. Ask questions and be interested because everyone knows that in order to be interesting you need to be interested!

2. Take the time to find free listings on the internet and add your business to it. Search engines love links back to your website so the more you have the more popular you’ll seem.

3. Contributions: Create a blog or give feedback on other blogs which will in turn show how competent you are in your business and also send traffic to your website.

4. Check your emails. If people are enquiring about your product or service and you’re not resending to the enquiry then they will go elsewhere. A little while ago I sent out 50 emails. Out of those 50 only 25 opened the email! How mad is that?

5. Use Twitter and Facebook to promote your business. I know, you’re probably thinking “I don’t know anything about Twitter”. Look, Twitter is just a little learning curve. Give it a go and if you get stuck give me a call! :-)

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Too good to be true

Too good to be true

Too Good To Be True!


Business Radio is all about helping small businesses. We do this by giving them free advertising on our Radio station and various other ways. Now, whenever we do a show it gets stored on a platform called Mixcloud. Mixcloud stores our shows and we play them through our website and anyone who happens to find us on Mixcloud. What this means is that people can hear the program again and again. This also means that if we play a commercial for you for FREE, then it will be listened to again and again. Straightforward? Are you still wth me? If you advertise with us, unlike other companies, your advert will be listened to again and again!

But it’s funny how people react to “Free”. I imagine that if I walked up to people in the street and handed out £10 notes that there might be little resistance, they may wonder if the notes were fake or that perhaps I was an eccentric millionaire? And you’ve heard the term “Too Good To Be True” or “If it looks too good to be true then it probably is”

 

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How to write the perfect CV

 

When writing a curriculum vitae really think about what you want to say. This is your opportunity to really sell yourself.

Your CV should include the following information –

Personal information – Full name, postal address, mobile number, home telephone number, e-mail addressProfile – Your key strengths/skills and what it is about you that makes you a good potential employee. Try to keep this section brief and to one paragraph.Education – Dates with the name and town of the education establishments that you attended. List passed qualifications gained and details of any specific qualifications that the role requires.Employment – Put your jobs in chronological order starting with your current or most recent role and working backwards. Include the dates you were employed, your job title, the company name and a brief, factual summary of your duties. If you have any periods of unemployment explain with the dates what you were doing e.g. charity work, travelling etcSkills – Any additional languages, software packages etcInterests – Any hobbies, sports or pastimes that display your enthusiasm, commitment and willingness to learn

Interview Preparation

Read and fully understand the job descriptionResearch the company – how long have they been trading, how many staff do they employ, what industry is their business in.Dress smartly and look presentable. Smart business dress with clean shoes will make the right impression – remember first impressions count!Smile, relax and be polite, ask relevant questions and remember above all to thank the interviewer for their time.

If you need some help looking for your next role please get in touch.

www.parmarstaffing.co.uk

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Do away with opening times!

Do away with opening times!

I still can’t get my head around highstreet shops or businesses that open at 09:30, what is that about? It’s as if you’re telling your customers to “sod off, we’re not interested until 09:30” Whereupon you’ll put a smile on your face and welcome them in?

There was a time when you could open whenever you wanted, sell whatever you wanted but those days have long gone. People now have a choice such as the internet which is open 24X7, other shops that are open at 08:30 and other companies who are “Hungry” for any business even if it is before 09:30.

In a world where people have so much choice can you really afford not to be more accessible?

My advice to the small business person is this: It’s a tough world out there and if you are going make it in business you really need to find ways to make it easier for your customers to buy from you instead of putting up barriers such as opening times and locked doors.

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Get Social!

Get Social!

Social media!

In my opinion social media is not the be all and end all of your business (depending on what your business is) If your business is all about Social media and you don’t use it then you might have a hard time trying to convince people that you know what you are talking about. There again if you are in manual labour such as painting and decorating or a mechanic, then, while Twitter may not be your thing, Facebook might be, and the reason that Facebook might be for you is that there are lost more “domestic” users on Facebook and more likely to be looking for your services. Is that narrow minded?The above said, there is nothing wrong with having lots of social media accounts to protect your business name but once you have your name.

Should you decide that you want to get some business from using social media then here are some points to remember.

1. Whichever social media platform you decide on, one posting per day is not enough. 2. Because your target market may be following more than one account you need to give more information more regularly.3. Social media is a full-time job. you can't just tweet or face now and then. Keep your audience hungry for more information.4. Don’t have the time to do it? If you don’t have the time to do it properly then get someone to do it for you. There are many individuals out there who could do with the business, just don’t get ripped off paying lots of money for very little.

There are many companies out there who would gladly take your social media business away from you in return for some cash, unfortunately some of these companies just want your cash :-)

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What's in a name?

What's in a name?

What’s in a name?

Well pretty much everything really because if people don’t know what you are called how are they going to find you? “Well they can always google you” I can hear you say but that is always the case.

Some names you come up by yourself something like “business radio” it does what it says while others not so. I know of an international company who spent tens of thousands of pounds on a marketing company to come up with a unique name. While initially some people found it hard to pronounce, now 7 years on, they are one of the most respected companies in their field and no one mispronounces their name.

I know a photographer who says my “name is xxx-xxx and I’m a photographer” but when you search for this person online they don’t exist under their name or if they do it’s on some blogging site or someone else’s website giving them credit. Then you find out that the company name that they are using is nothing like what you’d expect, like “Boots” not selling boots or “Currys” not selling curry. While there are companies out there who can carry this really well such as Apple, M&S, Microsoft, these companies have been around for years or have had a significant amount of money poured into them so that they have now become household names.

I think that my advice would be when it comes to names, try to use something that describes what you are about and not too weird:-)and there is nothing with using your own name if you are the business.

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Small business and missed opportunities

Small business and missed opportunities

You know, having a business is a little like growing up. We grow the business and develop new ideas. We try things and some work out while others don’t. We learn from the things we didn’t quite get right and we smile at the things that worked. We get better at what we do by trying new things and developing new ideas.

As with growing up a business needs to be social. You as the business owner or representative need to be out there marketing your business and sometimes these opportunities smack us right in the mouth and somehow we miss them?

I don’t mind telling you that Business Radio will one day be very popular. It will be the centre of attention for large and small business, so if you get given an opportunity to be interviewed or come on the show, don’t turn it down because you may not get another opportunity to sound off about your business.

Being interviewed by Business Radio is more of a marketing exercise for small business because we believe that every small business should have the opportunity to advertise for free. Now if for some reason you decide to blow us out and not turn up or better still turn us down until we are further down the line, don’t be surprised if we decide not to have you on the show, ever.

In Sussex there are over 50,000 small businesses. If you decide that we’re not worth your time, don’t worry, we have another 49,999 other businesses to go through and I’m sure that a few of them will probably be your competitors.

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